Category Archives: QSF News

Why Do We Return to Wilderness? Wilderness News Fall-Winter 2015

Why Do We Return to Wilderness? Wilderness News Fall-Winter 2015

At the Quetico Superior Foundation (QSF), our mission is to protect the wilderness character of Minnesota’s border lakes canoe country and Ontario’s Quetico region. We do that through the publication of Wilderness News and by giving grants to non-profit organizations that share our mission. We know that leaving a lasting legacy is better done through the actions of many. Here, we pay tribute to and thank some of the organizations that have put our grants to use over the last few years…Continue Reading

Why Do We Return to Wilderness? Thoughts From Our Readers

Why Do We Return to Wilderness? Thoughts From Our Readers

  “On my early trips it used to take several days for the wilderness to “sink in”; now I find myself immersed almost immediately. I think it is because it is now a comfortable place for me. In my memories I can’t capture this feeling, contentment, and peace of mind. I can’t even describe it.…

Creating a Legacy: The Quetico Superior Foundation Grant Program

At the Quetico Superior Foundation (QSF), our mission is to protect the wilderness character of Minnesota’s Border Lakes Canoe Country and Ontario’s Quetico region. We do that through the publication of Wilderness News and by giving grants to non-profit organizations that share our mission. We know that leaving a lasting legacy is better done through…

Securing Sig’s Legacy, Mining Updates, Wilderness News Summer 2015

Securing Sig’s Legacy, Mining Updates, Wilderness News Summer 2015

  Cover Story: Sigurd Olson’s Legacy Returns Home By Greg Seitz The soul of Sigurd and Elizabeth Olson lives on at their home in Ely. The soul smells of fresh-baked cookies in the kitchen. In the writing shack on the property, it smells of cedar. It sounds like a breeze rustling the tall red pines…

Quetico Superior Foundation Board Member Profile: Emilie Hitch

Quetico Superior Foundation Board Member Profile: Emilie Hitch

Board member since 2010 Please tell us what your involvement with the Quetico Superior Foundation mean to you: Being involved with the QSF means a few things to me. First, it means that I am a part of a community of people who share my belief that protecting the wilderness is important. Secondly, it means…

State of the Boundary Waters and Paddling to DC – Wilderness News Fall Winter Issue

State of the Boundary Waters and Paddling to DC – Wilderness News Fall Winter Issue

Cover Story: How will proposed mining, climate change, invasive species, nutrient loading, and algal blooms change the border lakes? The Quetico-Superior region of Minnesota and Canada bring to mind lake country—a landscape characterized by glacier carved lakes filled with clear, cold and clean water. Yet the list of possible impacts on northern Minnesota water quality is long: proposed mining, climate change, invasive species, nutrient loading, and algal blooms to name just a few…Continue Reading

Quetico Superior Foundation Board Member Profile: Dodd Cosgrove

Board member since… “It has been long enough that I have lost track. I would guess at least twenty years.”   Please tell us what your involvement with the Quetico Superior Foundation means to you: Beginning with a trip to Trout Lake a month before the Wilderness Act was passed in 1964, I have travelled…

Meet Board Member Nell Smith

Meet Board Member Nell Smith

Board member since 2007 Please tell us what your involvement with the Quetico Superior Foundation means to you: Taking care of our environment is critical to our and our children’s future. Preserving the Quetico-Superior region wilderness provides a unique opportunity for people to connect with the natural world and the not-too-distant past when our country…

Meet Stewart Crosby

Board member since 2004 Please tell us what your involvement with the Quetico Superior Foundation means to you: The Quetico-Superior region is a unique landscape that I have enjoyed visiting all my life. I’ve lived in other parts of the country and that’s made me realize how special the boundary lakes region is and how…

Meet Board Member John Case

Board member since: I’d guess I’ve been on the QSF board for 25 years. Please tell us what your involvement with the Quetico Superior Foundation means to you: I think it is important to protect the few remaining places that are still relatively untouched. I appreciate being on the QSF board because I can be…

Meghan Cosgrove

Board member since May 2012 Please tell us what your involvement with the Quetico Superior Foundation means to you: Some of my most formative experiences growing up came from canoe trips in the Quetico-Superior region. By working with the Foundation and the grant program, I hope to not only help protect the region but also…

Abandon Camp!

Abandon Camp!

  By Larry Christianson “Abandon Camp” and “Pagami Creek Fire” entered our boundary waters lingo in a sudden and dramatic escape from a fast spreading forest fire. But first . . . the rest of the story, beginning with extra care in planning for what was to be our longest canoe trip yet. Pushing beyond…

The 1999 Blowdown and Forest Management Practices Impacts the Pagami Creek Fire

The 1999 Blowdown and Forest Management Practices Impacts the Pagami Creek Fire

By Charlie Mahler Natural fires in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness – those started by lightning rather than, say, by careless campers – provide opportunities and risks for the managers of the BWCAW and the surrounding Superior National Forest. Since the Forest Service doesn’t set fires in the wilderness for ecological purposes, natural fires…

Meet Dyke Williams

Please tell us what your involvement with the Questico Superior Foundation means to you: I’ve been on the Board of the Quetico Superior Foundation for several years, including being one of the “Group of 15” that founded Heart of the Continent Partnership, manager of the White Pine Initiative, a member of the International Community Congress…

Working Together to Protect Wilderness

Working Together to Protect Wilderness

The Summer Issue of Wilderness News is in the mail and now online. The theme is Working Together to Protect Wilderness — check out a few highlights below.   What’s Inside: Voices for the North Country Readers respond to Wilderness News Read More > A New Model for Partnership Meet the Wolf Lake Citizen’s Monitoring Group. Together…

Proposed Legislation Could Undermine the Wilderness Act and the Protection of Wilderness

Proposed Legislation Could Undermine the Wilderness Act and the Protection of Wilderness

On the surface, two proposed pieces of legislation appear unrelated to wilderness protection. The Sportsmen’s Heritage Act seeks “to protect and enhance opportunities for recreational hunting, fishing and shooting.” The National Security and Federal Lands Protection Act was designed to provide “operational control” for border security on federal public and tribal lands within 100 miles…

Keep it Wild, Keep it Free

Voices for the North Country: Readers respond to Wilderness News How fortunate we are in North America to have wild public lands where we can camp, travel and be part of wild nature. We might imagine that these areas are wild because they were set aside in a pristine condition for future generations to enjoy.…

Meet Andrew Steiner

Quetico Superior Foundation Board Member Profile Please tell us what your involvement with the Quetico Superior Foundation means to you: The region holds many of my fondest memories. I find serenity in the isolation, beauty, and physical exertion associated with my visits to the Boundary Waters. It is my favorite place. My father first took…

A New Model for Partnership

A New Model for Partnership

By Alissa Johnson Meet the Wolf Lake Citizen’s Monitoring Group. Together with the Forest Service, they’re proving that private landowners and the government can work together to care for land. The relationship between the Wolf Lake Citizen’s Monitoring Group and the U.S. Forest Service started in an all too familiar way: in court. In 1997,…

Quetico Superior Foundation: Giving All Voices A Fair Hearing

Quetico Superior Foundation: Giving All Voices A Fair Hearing

By Alissa Johnson When I was in high school—the mid-1990s—a debate arose over motorboat access to the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness (BWCAW). I went to a demonstration to keep motors out; it was a spring or summer day, and I remember the way the sun sparkled on Como Lake in St. Paul. I met…

Gray Hairs: Saving a Place for Youth in the Great Outdoors

Gray Hairs: Saving a Place for Youth in the Great Outdoors

By Cliff Jacobson, Wilderness Guide & Outdoor Writer Last year, I presented a program for the Minnesota Canoe Association. About 150 people attended. With the exception of six teenage girls—who were there to show slides of their trip in the Boundary Waters—everyone (including me) had gray hair. Murmurs of “look at all the gray beards”…

Pagami Creek Fire in the BWCAW

Pagami Creek Fire in the BWCAW

The Pagami Creek Fire blazes into the largest naturally occurring wildfire in a century. By Charlie Mahler In the heat of summer, with the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness peppered with campers, U.S. Forest Service officials charged with managing the million-acre wilderness and the surrounding Superior National Forest faced a decision. A lightning-caused fire was…

Wilderness News Summer Edition is Online

The Summer 2011 Issue of Wilderness News Print Edition is now online! Click here to download the PDF > Featured in this issue: Chik-Wauk Museum and Nature Center By Rob Kesselring Take a drive to the end of the Gunflint Trail and spend a few hours at Chik-Wauk Museum, the word serendipity will come to…

Wilderness News Print Edition – Spring 2011

The Spring 2011 Issue of Wilderness News Print Edition is now online! Experience Lake Superior from a kayak, travel back in time with an early voice for the Boundary Waters, and follow urban teens-at-risk into the wilderness in canoes they built by hand.
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Last Chance to Take our Survey

There’s still time to share your opinion! In the recent Summer 2010 issue of Wilderness News, we published the results of our reader survey sent by mail – but if you missed it, you can take our Online Survey and have your voice heard. Help Us Stay Up to Date: As a free subscriber to Wilderness…

Wilderness News Print Edition Summer 2010

The Summer 2010 Issue of Wilderness News Print Edition is now online! Download the full pdf, read the feature stories – from wilderness research on Fall Lake to the impact of climate change on the BWCAW, updates on mining controversy and a new hiking trail through the Arrowhead, find out what’s going on in the Quetico Superior region.Continue Reading

Wilderness News Spring 2010 is Online

Featured in this issue:
Big Bill Wenstrom — Last Man Standing by Barbara Wenstrom Shank and William P. Wenstrom. Special Report: New Trends in Visits to Quetico-Superior Wilderness by Charlie Mahler. Book Review: A Modern-Day Voyageur Family; Paddling the 3,000 Mile Fur Trade Canoe Route Across the U.S. and Canada, by Timothy J. Kent. Wilderness Essay: Moments of Clarity by Andy Wright. The Heart of the Continent Partnership Comes of Age, by Rob Kesselring.Continue Reading

Big Bill Wenstrom – Last Man Standing

Sig Olson’s readers were introduced to Big Bill Wenstrom in Open Horizons (p. 97). Sig wrote: “It was Big Bill Wenstrom who taught me how to throw on a canoe. He didn’t tell me, but I noticed the ease with which he did it, the balancing on his thighs, the short kick of the hips, the twist of the arms as the canoe went overhead…”Continue Reading

Fall Issue of Wilderness News

The Fall 2009 issue of Wilderness News (the print edition) is here! If you’re a subscriber, watch for your mailed copy soon. Or download a PDF of the full issue, and read all of the stories, with full-color photographs, and help us save on mailing costs.Continue Reading

Wilderness News Profile: Frederick Winston

In 1964, Fred Winston received an inquiry following Wilderness News’ inaugural publication: “I can see that there are many sides to Minnesota’s wilderness problem. But which side are you on? What are you trying to prove?” In his reply, Fred Winston set the tone for the Quetico Superior Foundation’s role in the ever changing wilderness debate and set an example of activism.Continue Reading

The State of the Wilderness 30 Years After the BWCAW Act of 1978

On the thirtieth anniversary of the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness Act of 1978, Wilderness News set out to assess the current state of the wilderness and its management. We uncovered a transformation in the challenges facing the region. Where issues like motor use once topped management concerns, they are giving way to increasingly complex challenges that defy man-made boundaries and may have significant implications for how we think about — and manage — the Boundary Waters.Continue Reading

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